Episode 3: Emily's Food Tour Part 1 – Tucson

Food and travel writer Emily Elyse Miller returned to her Arizona roots to find a burgeoning food scene had sprung up in her absence. Follow her exploration of the heritage-inspired cuisine scene in Tucson, the world's first UNESCO World City of Gastronomy. Presented by Arizona Office of Tourism

Released on 2/3/2017

Credits

Director: Beau Beyerle
Director of Photography: Beau Beyerle
Producer: Steve Filmer

Transcript

00:00
(Lose Control by Matt Simons)
00:05
♫ Run away with me.
00:07
♫ Leave it all behind.
00:08
[Emily Voiceover] I grew up in Arizona
00:09
and I was just so surprised that there's so many
00:12
incredible producers and makers.
00:14
Tucson has always been a food destination.
00:17
So I really was excited to really understand what makes it
00:20
so special and why these ingredients are so important.
00:24
(Lose Control by Matt Simons)
00:25
♫ Get lifted when we lose it all.
00:28
This is an edible walking tour, so we can --
00:31
That is my favorite kind of tour.
00:31
(laughing)
00:33
What it actually is, is an agricultural museum.
00:35
We grow things to show how things used to grow historically.
00:39
All the different historical periods
00:41
that represent the history of Arizona.
00:43
This is a mild melon.
00:45
It's a watermelon.
00:46
Yeah!
00:47
You wanna cut that in half?
00:48
No!
00:49
(laughing)
00:51
That is watermelon at it's best.
00:53
(Lose Control by Matt Simons)
00:54
♫ People 'round us singin' loud.
00:55
♫ It's just you and me right now.
00:57
What kind of salsa are you making?
00:58
Pico de Gallo.
00:59
And then these are just dried chilies?
01:00
Those are ancho chilies.
01:01
(cracking)
01:05
Oh it's so nice.
01:07
Ready?
01:08
(crunching)
01:10
I mean yes. Oh yeah that's good.
01:11
I love it, yeah.
01:14
This is the Cuban sunset or sunrise?
01:17
Cuban sunset.
01:18
Okay, got it.
01:19
For some it might be Cuban sunrise, I dunno.
01:21
This is one of the most biodiverse regions
01:23
in the United States.
01:24
It's because everything has to change and adapt.
01:28
If you eat some of the dishes from this region,
01:30
you could be anywhere in the world with your eyes closed,
01:32
but you know where those foods came from.
01:34
We have a lot of really creative and imaginative,
01:37
chefs here are doing wonderful things with the raw products.
01:40
And so that creates this culinary culture.
01:45
We've been for 21 years at this property.
01:47
It's got a really rich history.
01:49
It was originally a ranch school for girls.
01:52
Oh (mumbles)
01:52
Started in 1929.
01:54
It's got a great sense of place, you can tell by the
01:57
gardens and the care that's put into it.
01:59
Still a little roughness of the desert.
02:01
Right.
02:02
Because we like that.
02:03
It is a desert oasis here in Tucson.
02:06
We're really delighted that the city's been
02:08
honored with the UNESCO designation
02:10
as a World City of gastronomy.
02:12
I think that's spectacular for our chefs.
02:14
And all the chefs around town have really been supporting.
02:19
Bienvenidos Emily!
02:20
Our restaurant is celebrating it's 94th year.
02:22
Wow!
02:24
We're the oldest Mexican restaurant,
02:26
continuous operation in the state by the same family.
02:30
It is really important for us
02:31
to pass down traditional dishes.
02:34
These ingredients are indigenous to this area.
02:37
They have been around for years.
02:40
And the Native American people from this area
02:42
use many of these foods to sustain themselves.
02:45
And I think that's one of the things that really makes
02:48
Tucson so special about this award they were given
02:52
from UNESCO, is because so many of the foods are not
02:55
foods that had to be brought in.
02:57
They're foods that are here.
03:01
Oh my goodness!
03:03
You see, that's honey right there.
03:06
Honey comes from flowers.
03:08
And there's at least a hundred species of flowering
03:10
plants, if not 200 on the property alone.
03:13
And each of those flowers is going to give an entirely
03:16
distinctly flavored honey that's unique to that plant.
03:19
It's incredible how different it is from the first one.
03:21
Honey is at least as sensitive
03:23
to place and time as wine is.
03:25
And these are all from the Tucson area.
03:27
And different places, even just a few miles apart,
03:29
will give you a radically different honey.
03:31
And those honeys taste as different as they look.
03:33
And the point is, to show people
03:34
where their food comes from.
03:35
Exactly! The point is to
03:36
involve the community in the act of
03:38
actually growing and harvesting the food.
03:40
And engage people with where their food comes from.
03:44
So a couple of things make us unique.
03:46
One is the use of mesquite to dry malt.
03:49
So we're basically using a Scottish model to make
03:51
Sonoran Desert single malt whiskey.
03:54
Whisky Del Bac Dorado is the brainchild
03:57
of the whole project.
03:58
I can immediately smell the whisky, it's really --
04:00
Nice?
04:01
So nice!
04:02
It smells like Arizona.
04:04
(Lose Control by Matt Simons)
04:05
♫ We can be here in this crowd.
04:07
♫ Feel the music.
04:08
[Emily Voiceover] Everyone who we met
04:10
just seems not only connected to their family,
04:11
but to the land and the food
04:13
and they just really wanted to share that with everyone.
04:17
(Lose Control by Matt Simons)
04:18
♫ Do you think we could lose control?
More from golfdigest.com
Equipment The Complete Hot List
Equipment The Complete Hot List
Golf Culture Most Annoying Golfers
Golf Culture Most Annoying Golfers
Instruction How To Do Everything
Instruction How To Do Everything
News & Tours Blog: Stay In The Loop
News & Tours Blog: Stay In The Loop
Ranking 100 Greatest Courses
Ranking 100 Greatest Courses
Cover Story Paulina Gretzky
Cover Story Paulina Gretzky